Boxing Tip #12: Understanding Weight Transfer and Flow

Every movement in one direction results in an adjustment in the opposite direction.

That adjustment creates a natural expected flow as a result of any movement to re-position the boxer's weight distribution.

The technique below opened my eyes and finally made me understand the whole concept of weight transfer and flow.

As I worked through this combination a light bulb went on and I completely understood how one movement or punch puts you in position for another. Maybe it was the explanation at the time, or maybe I was just open to understanding that day, but I hope I can do this justice and give you the same light bulb moment.

The technique below opened my eyes and finally made me understand the whole concept of weight transfer and flow.

As I worked through this combination a light bulb went on and I completely understood how one movement or punch puts you in position for another. Maybe it was the explanation at the time, or maybe I was just open to understanding that day, but I hope I can do this justice and give you the same light bulb moment.

The Defense - How to Use the Double Slip - Bob

The Defense - How to Use the Double Slip - Bob

You can use this defensive maneuver and counter attack when your opponent throws a 1-2-3 combination (Jab, Straight Right, Left Hook).

Visualize it:

  1. If you fight orthodox, your left foot is forward. Picture an orthodox opponent also with his left foot forward.
  2. Now in slow motion, picture his lead hand coming towards you, throwing a jab at your head.
  3. Just before it impacts, you slip to your right (outside).
  4. You know a straight right is now on its way as your opponent's torso begins to twist, squaring off in front of you.
  5. Again you slip, this time to your left and now stop this picture in your mind at the extreme left of your slip

That's the double slip portion of the technique and it is obviously good against 1-2 combinations.

If your opponent stops there, fine, the double-slip puts you in a position to counter with a left hook to either the body or head. But, I'd expect at least a three punch combination attack. The 1-2 will be followed by a 3, so as he brings the left hook around to catch you as you recover from your slip, alter your slip path and duck/bob back to the right as the hook flies harmlessly over your head.

You can use this defensive maneuver and counter attack when your opponent throws a 1-2-3 combination (Jab, Straight Right, Left Hook).

Visualize it:

  1. If you fight orthodox, your left foot is forward. Picture an orthodox opponent also with his left foot forward.
  2. Now in slow motion, picture his lead hand coming towards you, throwing a jab at your head.
  3. Just before it impacts, you slip to your right (outside).
  4. You know a straight right is now on its way as your opponent's torso begins to twist, squaring off in front of you.
  5. Again you slip, this time to your left and now stop this picture in your mind at the extreme left of your slip

That's the double slip portion of the technique and it is obviously good against 1-2 combinations.

If your opponent stops there, fine, the double-slip puts you in a position to counter with a left hook to either the body or head. But, I'd expect at least a three punch combination attack. The 1-2 will be followed by a 3, so as he brings the left hook around to catch you as you recover from your slip, alter your slip path and duck/bob back to the right as the hook flies harmlessly over your head.

The Counter Attack - How to Throw the Body-Body-Head

The Counter Attack - How to Throw the Body-Body-Head

Right at this point, your opponent has missed you (hopefully) and is fully extended and twisted slightly away from you trying to recover from his hook. You are now in a position to inflict some damage and regain the initiative in the fight.

Think of how you are positioned at this point. Likely crouched, bent slightly to the right (weight more over on the right). There is a giant body target in front of you, so nail it with everything you've got - Right Hook to the Body and follow through with the weight transfer. Ensure you keep low as you twist back to the left.

If you hit your opponent right, he is going to twist back to his left (your right) which will open up his body on his right (your left). Take advantage of it and throw a left hook to the body.

That body assault is going to make your opponent drop his guard enough to give you a clean shot with either a left hook or straight right to the head. That left hook to the body transferred weight back to your right - so it is natural to throw a straight right. But, because it's natural it's also predictable - so I prefer another left hook at this point - so immediately follow your left hook to the body with a left hook to the head. Notice how doing so breaks the natural flow of weight from left to right. There's the body-body-head portion of this boxing combination.

Right at this point, your opponent has missed you (hopefully) and is fully extended and twisted slightly away from you trying to recover from his hook. You are now in a position to inflict some damage and regain the initiative in the fight.

Think of how you are positioned at this point. Likely crouched, bent slightly to the right (weight more over on the right). There is a giant body target in front of you, so nail it with everything you've got - Right Hook to the Body and follow through with the weight transfer. Ensure you keep low as you twist back to the left.

If you hit your opponent right, he is going to twist back to his left (your right) which will open up his body on his right (your left). Take advantage of it and throw a left hook to the body.

That body assault is going to make your opponent drop his guard enough to give you a clean shot with either a left hook or straight right to the head. That left hook to the body transferred weight back to your right - so it is natural to throw a straight right. But, because it's natural it's also predictable - so I prefer another left hook at this point - so immediately follow your left hook to the body with a left hook to the head. Notice how doing so breaks the natural flow of weight from left to right. There's the body-body-head portion of this boxing combination.

Put it all Together and Practice the Double Slip-Bob-Body-Body-Head

Put it all Together and Practice the Double Slip-Bob-Body-Body-Head

Best way to perfect this technique is to break it into two parts and then combine them once you've perfected both.

  1. Defensive Portion - learn to thwart the attack and end up in the perfect position to launch your offensive actions. So, start slow and have someone throw a 1-2-3 combination at you. Keep low and tight and slip at the last second. You need to draw out the entire 1-2-3 combination in order to get yourself in position to fight back. If your opponent doesn't commit entirely to the 1-2-3 combination, it's going to mess up your plans, so provide him the targets - but be fast enough to ensure he misses. Slip, slip, bob - Slip, slip, bob. A lot of this comes from your legs, so start doing those body weight squats...

  2. Offensive Portion - Here's where the weight transfer is extremely important. Throw the right hook to the body and notice how your weight naturally transfers over to the left. Let it. Follow through and let it load your left hook. Once loaded, throw it - Snap and then throw another left hook to the head immediately afterwards. The timing for the whole action is Snap--------Snap, Snap.

Ideally, you want to practice this with someone who can throw a 1-2-3 combination, but you can just as easily visualize what is happening with a heavy bag. Heavy bag work becomes 200% more effective if you are visualizing it as an opponent. It is not just a big padded leather bag, it is an opponent complete with arms that throw punches at you. The sooner you picture that, the sooner you can develop those reactions required to evade those punches in the ring.

Let me know if you try this and tell me how it works out for you. Boxon.

Best way to perfect this technique is to break it into two parts and then combine them once you've perfected both.

  1. Defensive Portion - learn to thwart the attack and end up in the perfect position to launch your offensive actions. So, start slow and have someone throw a 1-2-3 combination at you. Keep low and tight and slip at the last second. You need to draw out the entire 1-2-3 combination in order to get yourself in position to fight back. If your opponent doesn't commit entirely to the 1-2-3 combination, it's going to mess up your plans, so provide him the targets - but be fast enough to ensure he misses. Slip, slip, bob - Slip, slip, bob. A lot of this comes from your legs, so start doing those body weight squats...


  2. Offensive Portion - Here's where the weight transfer is extremely important. Throw the right hook to the body and notice how your weight naturally transfers over to the left. Let it. Follow through and let it load your left hook. Once loaded, throw it - Snap and then throw another left hook to the head immediately afterwards. The timing for the whole action is Snap--------Snap, Snap.

Ideally, you want to practice this with someone who can throw a 1-2-3 combination, but you can just as easily visualize what is happening with a heavy bag. Heavy bag work becomes 200% more effective if you are visualizing it as an opponent. It is not just a big padded leather bag, it is an opponent complete with arms that throw punches at you. The sooner you picture that, the sooner you can develop those reactions required to evade those punches in the ring.

Let me know if you try this and tell me how it works out for you. Boxon.

    Coach Aaron

    Coach Aaron founded Commando Boxing in 2003. When he's not boxing, he's running ultramarathons or using data science/blockchains to create mixed reality HoloLens applications.

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